Ask Jeeves to Launch Paid Search Platform

written by
Friday, July 29, 2005

Ask Jeeves to Launch Paid Search PlatformThe Internet's favorite butler, Ask Jeeves, has made known their plans to further develop and market their own Paid-Search advertising platform, and disband their current paid-placement agreement with Google AdWords. The new platform is said to go live in 2007 when Jeeves' agreement with Google is complete. Their paid-search program is expected to be based on keyword bidding, however, other "measure of relevance" parameters may also be factored in.

Ask Jeeves to Launch Paid Search Platform

The Internet's favorite butler, Ask Jeeves, has made known their plans to further develop and market their own Paid-Search advertising platform, and disband their current paid-placement agreement with Google AdWords. The new platform is said to go live in 2007 when Jeeves' agreement with Google is complete.

Furthermore, Ask Jeeves' paid-search program is expected to be based on keyword bidding, however, other "measure of relevance" parameters may also be factored in as well. I'd imagine that the search engine will follow in Google's foot steps and create a system where click-through rate and other metrics are important factors of cost and positioning.

My Thoughts

It should be obvious to everyone at this point that Jeeves is now in a position to step toe-to-toe with Yahoo!, Google, and MSN. While sponsored search is a highly competitive marketplace, one currently being dominated by Google and Yahoo!, Ask Jeeves will have an opportunity to generate some serious revenue from the selling of paid ads. Additional revenue can be used to better their search technology and further develop quality features capable of attracting more search users.

I am in no way suggesting that Jeeves will be able to immediately steal market share from it's competitors, but one has to start somewhere. Personally, I believe this is a great start!

Labels:


Yahoo! Acquires Konfabulator

written by
Tuesday, July 26, 2005
Yahoo! Acquires Konfabulator

This past week Yahoo! announced its acquisition of software widget-engine Konfabulator. Konfabulator is a JavaScript run-time engine that allows users to run very small applications, or widgets, on either Windows or Mac systems. Yahoo! was said to have made this purchase as a way to spur third-party developers into creating new applications for their web services.

What Does Yahoo! Have Planned?

Konfabulator is one of many key pieces for accessing Internet content. With Yahoo! now in the picture, together they will be making these resources available to everyone in a format that's useable outside the traditional browser, as in XML feeds. These applications can perform any of a range of functions, from informing people of their Wi-Fi signal strength to dishing up the local weather to providing a battery monitor. There are literally hundreds of widgets available.

My Thoughts

This acquisition comes at a time where Yahoo! is looking for more ways to attract third-party developers, and get those developers involved with writing applications for Yahoo!'s content. Through this process, Yahoo! is hoping to put pressure on its rivals, Google and MSN, and create something unique. Personally, I believe acquiring Konfabulator was a great move on Yahoo!'s part, and I hope it pays off for them.

Labels:


ad:tech Conference: Chicago, 2005

written by
Monday, July 18, 2005
ad:tech Conference: Chicago, 2005

This past week I joined 2,500 other marketers, publishers, and agencies and attended the ad:tech conference in Chicago. ad:tech is a 2-day marketing conference and expo that captures the insights, tools and techniques that today's business and marketing leaders need. In addition, I was able to meet and speak with several of the industry's top marketing professionals which was something I enjoyed and valued very much.

Conference

First of all, ad:tech is by no way a search engine marketing conference show to the likes of which I normally attend. While it did offer a few SEM related sessions here and there, the material was nothing too advance. In fact, it was if they just wanted to cover the basics of what search marketing means to websites, and then leave it at that. Instead, the conference was about marketing in general which I found to be quite refreshing.

My absolute favorite moment of the entire conference was a keynote lecture given by Guy Kawasaki, Managing Director of Garage Technology Ventures. I am a big fan of Guy's and very much enjoyed his ideas and comments on innovation and how industries, such as search, will continue to evolve and prosper.

Networking Opportunities

In addition, the conference provided several opportunities to network with like-minded professionals. I found that the hotel bars, hallways, and lobbies were full of attendees talking shop, exchanging contact information, and more or less just having a good time.

Exhibit Hall

The exhibit hall was exactly how one might imagine it to be... very busy, very loud, and most of all very exciting. Vendors included Yahoo!, Miva (formerly FindWhat), Kanoodle, ClickTracks, and many other Internet companies. I was able to get a few minutes of face time with my search engine reps, and speak with several great companies regarding services that I never knew existed.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed ad:tech. I practically filled an entire notebook with new ideas and products to test and implement, which is always a good sign of a worthwhile conference.

Labels:


Google Develops AdWords Professional Program

written by
Sunday, July 10, 2005

Google Develops AdWords Professional ProgramGoogle AdWords has recently developed an online training program for advertisers and search marketers that when completed will grant them with special privileges, proper certification, and the title "AdWords Qualified Professional" - a title which can be used to promote oneself and attract new business. The program features a compiled a list of credentials that an ideal "professional" needs to meet in order to be considered for the program.

Google Develops AdWords Professional Program

Google AdWords has recently developed an online training program for advertisers and search marketers that when completed will grant them with special privileges, proper certification, and the title "AdWords Qualified Professional" - a title which can be used to promote oneself and attract new business.

What is the Google AdWords Professional Program

Google, for the most part, has compiled a list of credentials that an ideal "professional" needs to meet in order to be considered for the program. Once an advertiser or marketing professional has met those credentials, they are then enrolled into the program and expected to take and pass a timed, multiple-choice type test on the many facets of the Google AdWords platform. The tests will range from 100 - 115 questions.

My Thoughts

This past week I decided it was time to prepare, study, and take the professionals exam, and to be honest it wasn't as easy as one might believe. I spend hours each day managing Google AdWords accounts, and yet, I was tested on several areas of the platform to which I am not all that familiar with. Google requires that candidates score a 75% or higher on their exam. I am happy to report that I scored a solid 92%. Furthermore, I did find the exam to be tricky in that Google focused on smaller elements to the management process rather than big-picture stuff.

At this point, I see very little benefit to being named an "AdWords Qualified Professional", and would not likely recommend this program to my colleagues. Essentially what it comes down to is my company paid $50 for the privilege of me being named a Google professional. I learned nothing new about the AdWords platform, nor have I changed the way in which I manage my client's paid-search accounts. In fact, I believe the true value of this program lies within the ability to market oneself as an "AdWords Professional". However, until my clients and the general population has an understanding of what this means, it does me absolutely zero good.

Labels:


Google Launches 'Video Search' Feature

written by
Friday, July 01, 2005
Google Launches 'Video Search' Feature

One can't help but think that "lights, camera, and action" is this month's theme for our Internet search engines. Following Yahoo!'s lead, Google has just announced it's newest search feature, a premiere web-based video search service.

What is Video Search

Google has given its users the option of searching video content directly from the company's indexed video database and while using the same keywords used for other types of search. This new search function will complement Google's existing beta version, which currently people search, but not yet play back, the closed-caption text of television shows from PBS, CNN and others that Google has hosted.

Google Video is currently only available in English (IE ver. 5 and higher and Firefox) and will require that users download the "Google Video Viewer," a tool needed in order to watch an entire video piece or a section of a movie relating to their search keywords.

My Thoughts

Obvious this is another step in the search giant's expansion into more comprehensive media services. As it stands now, Google is the only search provider that has all the pieces to bring movies on demand via Internet to the masses. Furthermore, you could bet your bottom dollar that at some point real soon Google will discover a system where they will be able to charge per-view or subscription fees, as well as insert ads into the video stream.

Labels:


Yahoo! Tests 'Personalized Search' Feature

written by
Friday, July 01, 2005

Yahoo! Tests 'Personalized Search' FeatureIn an effort to provide it's users with new, quality searching solutions and to narrow the gap with it's rivals, Yahoo! is testing a new service that extends its search functionality. Dubbed "My Web 2.0," the service builds on personalized search features introduced this past April. Those features allowed Yahoo! users to archive their search results and share them with other people using the service.

Yahoo! Tests 'Personalized Search' Feature

In an effort to provide it's users with new, quality searching solutions and to narrow the gap with it's rivals, Yahoo! is testing a new service that extends its search functionality. Dubbed "My Web 2.0," the service builds on personalized search features introduced this past April. Those features allowed Yahoo! users to archive their search results and share them with other people using the service, but the next iteration will go a bit further.

Internet searchers with a Yahoo! login will be able to bookmark and cache copies of their favorite websites, label them in certain categories and attach comments in a structured way. Users will then be able to search among their contacts' knowledge base with what Yahoo! is calling its "MyRank" search technology.

In many ways, the service bears a resemblance to the recently popular Delicious Web bookmarks manager. Like Delicious, Yahoo! has opened user's My Web application, allowing extensions to its service to be easily created. I predict that overtime we may see Yahoo! integrate personalization technology across other applications and services, proving a whole new level of user experience.

Labels: